quinta-feira, 29 de setembro de 2016

Louros estelares de glória acolhendo Nuvem Molecular, em Corona Australis, a Coroa Austral

Olá!


Corona Australis, a Coroa do Sul, é uma verdadeiro joia
que sempre pode ser bem visualizada a olho nu 
a partir de lugares de céus escuros e transparentes
e, de preferência, em noites de ausência de Lua.

A delicadeza das estrelas formando a figura de uma Coroa
é algo realmente enternecedor, emocionante, maravilhante!


É uma constelação pequenina, sim, porém extremamente fácil de ser encontrada:

ao visualizarmos as constelações Scorpius e Sagittarius, 
certamente nos surpreenderemos com a bela visão destes louros estelares de glória!

No entanto, esta tímida constelação, verdadeira joia,
acaba escondendo outros tesouros
que podem ser conhecidos através potentes telescópios
e que revelam um mundo de luzes sendo acolhidas
por uma nebulosa escura e esfumaçada
conhecida como Corona Australis Molecular Cloud
ou Nuvem Molecular Corona Australis.

Nesta Postagem, Caro Leitor,
descubra um tantinho dos tesouros revelados
pela nossa Coroa do Sul, Corona Australis.

Bons Estudos!

Com um abraço estrelado,
Janine Milward

Stellarium

Stellarium








Mario Jaci Monteiro - As Constelações, Cartas Celestes - CARJ







CORONA AUSTRALIS, A COROA AUSTRAL

Posicionamento:
Ascensão Reta 17h55m / 19h15m     Declinação -37o.0 / -45o.6

Mito:
Esta constelação poderia representar o colar usado pelo Sagitário
 ou a roda onde Ixiou sofreu tormentos 
por causa de seus insultos a Juno, mulher de Júpiter.


Algumas Informações Interessantes acerca esta Constelação:
Constelação que fazia parte do grupo original de 48 constelações 
formado por Ptolomeu no  século segundo DC.


Gamma Coronae A - Estrela Dupla
AR 19h03m  Dec. - 37o.08
Magnitude visual 5,0 e 5,1  Distância entre estrelas 1”,50


- 6a. Edição do Atlas Celeste
de autoria de Ronaldo Rogério de Freitas Mourão,
Editora Vozes, Petrópolis, ano de 1986


Programa Stellarium



Alpha Coronae Australis (α CrA, α Coronae Australis) is a star in the constellation Corona Australis. It is the only star in the constellation with a proper name, Alphekka Meridiana (Alphekka South), after the brightest star in Corona BorealisAlphecca. In Chinese astronomy, it is known as 鱉六 (the Sixth Star of the River Turtle). It is a Class A star like Vega, rotating extremely fast on its axis, close to its breakup velocity.
......................................................
The name Alphecca or Alphekka is Arabic, short for نير الفكّة nayyir al-fakka "the bright (star) of the broken (ring of stars)".[7]



Beta Coronae Australis (Beta CrAβ Coronae Australisβ CrA) is a K-type bright giant star in the constellation of Corona Australis.[1] It has an apparent visual magnitude of approximately 4.117.[1]



Lying alongside the Milky Way, Corona Australis contains one of the closest star-forming regions to our Solar System—a dusty dark nebula known as the Corona Australis Molecular Cloud, lying about 430 light years away. Within it are stars at the earliest stages of their lifespan. The variable stars R and TY Coronae Australis light up parts of the nebula, which varies in brightness accordingly.





http://www.ilovemaps.co.uk/collections/antique-celestial-maps/products/antique-celestial-map-by-ignace-gaston-pardies-1693-plate-5-of-6

Antique Celestial Map by Ignace Gaston Pardies - 1693


The text is in the public domain.
[image ALT: a blank space]
p172
. . . other few,
Below the Archer under his forefeet,
Led round in circle roll without a name.
Brown's Aratos.
Corona Australis, the Southern Crown,
often qualified by other synonymous adjectives, austrina, meridiana, meridionalis, or notia, is an inconspicuous constellation, although accepted in Ptolemy's time as one of the ancient forty-eight. On modern maps its location is close to the waist of Sagittarius, on the edge of the Milky Way.
The Germans know it as the Südliche Krone; the French, as the Couronne Australe; and the Italians, as the Corona Australe.
Aratos did not mention it by name unless in his use of the plural Στεφάνοι for both of the Crowns; yet doubtless had it in mind when he wrote of the Δινωτοί Κύκλω in our motto. His scholiast and Geminos had Οὐρανίσκος the Canopy; Δευτέρος, the Second; and Δευτέρα Κύκλα, the Second Circle. Hipparchos is said to have known it as Κηρυκεῖον, the Caduceus, or Herald's Wand of Peace, but this is not found in his Commentary. Ptolemy called it Στεφάνος νοτίος, the Southern Wreath.
Germanicus rendered the supposed reference in the Phainomena as Corona sine honore  i.e. without any such noteworthy tradition as is connected with the Northern Crown; commenting upon which, Grotius said that this author, as well as Cicero and Avienus, understood Aratos to refer to the southern figure; and added that this was the Centaur's Crown, those personages frequently being represented as wearing such. This idea doubtless originated from the outspreading sun-rays, in crown-like form, around the heads of the Gandharvas, the Aryan celestial horses that probably were the forerunners of the Centaurs. It was thus appropriately associated with the centaur Sagittarius and took the titleCorona Sagittarii.
p173Manilius did not allude to it; but others of the classical poets thought it the Crown that Bacchus placed in the sky in honor of his mother Semele; or one in commemoration of the fivefold victory of Corinna over Pindar in their poetical contest;a and some considered it the early Bunch of Arrows radiating from the hand of the Archer, often imagined as a wheel. This idea was expressed in its titles Τροχός Ἰξιόνος, and Rota Ixionis, the Wheel of Ixion, perhaps from the latter's relationship to the centaur Pholos.
Albumasar called it Coelum, while Coelulum and parvum Coelum, the Little Sky, i.e. Canopy, are from the Satyricon,1 the encyclopaedic writings of the Carthaginian Martianus Mineus Felix Capella of the 5th century, in the 8th book of which he treats of astronomy.
La Lande cited Sertum australe, the Southern Garland, and Orbiculus Capitis; Proctor, Brown, and Gore of the present day have Corolla, the Little Crown, but this was used 250 years ago by Caesius, who also gave Spira australis, the Southern Coil, and said that its stars represented theCrown of Eternal Life promised in the New Testament. Julius Schiller, however, went back a millennium before our era to the Diadem of Solomon.
Al Sufi is our authority for the Arabs' Al ubbah, literally the Tortoise, but secondarily the Woman's Tent, or traveling apartment, from its form; and it was Al ibaʽ, the Tent, and Kazwini's Al Udā al Naʽām, the Ostrich's Nest, for the same reason; the birds themselves being close by in what now are the Archer and the Eagle. Al Fakkah, the Dish, was borrowed from the Northern Crown, but among the later Arabians it wasAl Iklīl al Janūbiyyah, their equivalent for our title; Chilmead giving this as Alachil Algenubi; Riccioli, Elkleil Elgenubi; and Caesius, Aladil Algenubi.
The Chinese knew it by the figure current in early Arabia — Peē, the Tortoise.

Bayer illustrated Corona as a typical wreath, but without the streaming ribbons of its northern namesake, and the original Alfonsine Tables show a plain heart-shaped object with no semblance to the name. Gould assigns to it forty-nine stars, many more than even Heis does to its much more celebrated and noticeable counterpart in the north. Its lucida, the 4th‑magnitude α, at the eastern edge of the constellation, is Alfecca meridiana in the Latin translation of Reduan's Commentary. It culminates on the 13th of August.





http://www.iau.org/static/public/constellations/gif/CRA.gif 

IAU - International Astronomical Union


NGC 6541 é um aglomerado globular na direção da constelação de Corona Australis. O objeto foi descoberto pelo astrônomo Niccolò Cacciatore em 1826, usando umtelescópio refrator com abertura de 3 polegadas. Devido a sua moderada magnitude aparente (+6,3), é visível apenas com telescópios amadores ou com equipamentos superiores.







Zooming in 

on a stellar nursery in Corona Australis

In this zoom sequence we start with a broad panorama of the central parts of Milky Way. As we close in on part of the small constellation of Corona Australis we start to see faint clouds and in the final part of the video the full glory of the dramatic star formation region NGC 6729 is revealed in a new image from the FORS1 instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope.
Credit:
ESO/S. Brunier/Loke Kun Tan (StarryScapes.com)/Sergey Stepanenko. Music: John Dyson (from the album "Darklight")









Stars and Dust Across Corona Australis 
Image Credit & CopyrightIgnacio Diaz Bobillo
Explanation: Cosmic dust clouds sprawl across a rich field of stars in this sweeping telescopic vista near the northern boundary of Corona Australis, the Southern Crown. Less than 500 light-years away the dust clouds effectively block light from more distant background stars in the Milky Way. The entire frame spans about 2 degrees or over 15 light-years at the clouds' estimated distance. Near center is a group of lovely reflection nebulae cataloged as NGC 6726, 6727, 6729, and IC 4812. A characteristic blue color is produced as light from hot stars is reflected by the cosmic dust. The dust also obscures from view stars in the region still in the process of formation. Smaller yellowish nebula NGC 6729 surrounds young variable star R Coronae Australis. Below it are arcs and loops identified as Herbig Haro objects associated with energetic newborn stars. Magnificent globular star cluster NGC 6723 is at the right. Though NGC 6723 appears to be part of the group, its ancient stars actually lie nearly 30,000 light-years away, far beyond the young stars of the Corona Australis dust clouds.







Description
English: Detailed map of the Corona Australis Cloud.
Date2010-09-21 (last update)
SourceOwn work
Author



In the north of the constellation is the 
a dark molecular cloud with many embedded reflection nebulae,[20] including NGC 6729,NGC 6726–7, and IC 4812.[36] A star-forming region of around 7000 M,[20] it contains Herbig–Haro objects (protostars) and some very young stars.[36] About 430 light years (130 parsecs) away, it is one of the closest star-forming regions to our solar system.[37] The related NGC 6726 and 6727, along with unrelated NGC 6729, were first recorded by Johann Friedrich Julius Schmidt in 1865.[38]





NGC 6729 is a reflection/emission nebula in the constellation Corona Australis. It was discovered by Johann Friedrich Julius Schmidt in 1861.[1]
This fan-shaped nebula opens from the star R Coronae Australis toward the star T CrA to the south-east. R CrA is a pre-main-sequence star in the Corona Australis molecular complex, one of the closer star-forming regions of the galaxy.[1]




NASA, Caltech - NASA, Caltech : PIA13064: Star Clusters Young and Old, Near and Far


NGC 6726 é uma nebulosa na direção da constelação de Corona Australis. O objeto foi descoberto pelo astrônomo Julius Schmidt em 1861, usando um telescópio refrator com abertura de 6,2 polegadas.

NGC 6727 é uma nebulosa na direção da constelação de Corona Australis. O objeto foi descoberto pelo astrônomo Julius Schmidt em 1861, usando um telescópio refrator com abertura de 6,2 polegadas.

IC 4812 is a bright nebula in Corona Australis






Corona Australic Molecular Cloud region: Top left (top down): Bright nebulae NGC 6727NGC 6726 and NGC 6729 Below center: Double star BSO 14 in dim nebula IC 4812
Photo by André Hartmann RC-203/1624, FOV:40'x31', 15 June 2012, Helmeringhausen, Namibia

Photo byAndré Hartmann
URLhttps://skydrive.live.com/?cid=2671AB77998F0FAF&id=2671AB77998F0FAF!3604
DescriptionCorona Australic Molecular Cloud region: Top left (top down): Bright nebulae NGC 6727NGC 6726 and NGC 6729 Below center: Double star BSO 14 in dim nebula IC 4812
InstrumentRC-203/1624
Filternone
Date15 June 2012
Total time230.95 minutes
LocationHelmeringhausen, Namibia
Note
FOV40'x31'




Lying alongside the Milky Way, Corona Australis contains one of the closest star-forming regions to our Solar System—a dusty dark nebula known as the Corona Australis Molecular Cloud, lying about 430 light years away. Within it are stars at the earliest stages of their lifespan. The variable stars R and TY Coronae Australis light up parts of the nebula, which varies in brightness accordingly.





http://www.georgeglazer.com/maps/celestial/burritt/burritt.html
Elijah Hinsdale Burritt (1794-1838) (editor) 
W.G. Evans (engraver) 



Os desenhos formados pelas estrelas são como janelas que se abrem para a infinitude do universo e que possibilitam nossa mente a ir percebendo que existe mais, bem mais, entre o céu e a terra...; bem como percebendo que o caos, vagarosamente, vai se tornando Cosmos e sendo por nossa mente conscientizado.  

Quer dizer, nossa mente é tão infinita quanto infinito é o Cosmos.

COM UM ABRAÇO ESTRELADO,
Janine Milward